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Romania

Romania is a country in southeastern Europe. It is north of the Balkan Peninsula, on the Lower Danube River. Part of Romania is circled by the Carpathian Mountains. It also has a border on the Black Sea. Most of the Danube Delta is found inside R ...

Slovakia

Slovakia is a country with no access to the ocean in Central Europe. It is bordered by Austria in the southwest, Hungary in the south, Ukraine in the east, Poland in the north and Czech Republic in the northwest. Its capital city is Bratislava, t ...

Slovenia

Slovenia is a country in Southern Europe. The capital and largest city of Slovenia is Ljubljana. Its major language is Slovenian. Its current population is about 2.0 million. Slovenias leading exports are manufactured goods and aluminium. It is a ...

Turkey

Turkey is a country in both Europe and Asia. The area of Turkey is about 780.000 square kilometres. Turkey is a republic. There are 81 provinces in Turkey. The money of Turkey is called Turkish Lira. The capital city is Ankara, a city in the cent ...

Secretary General of NATO

The Secretary General of NATO is an international diplomat who serves as the chief civil servant of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. The Secretary General is responsible for coordinating the workings of the alliance, leading NATOs internat ...

French Revolution

The French Revolution was a revolution in France from 1789 to 1799. A result of the French Revolution was the end of the French monarchy. The revolution began with a meeting of the Estates General in Versailles, and ended when Napoleon Bonaparte ...

Thomas-Alexandre Dumas

Thomas-Alexandre Dumas became France’s first black general in 1793. This was the period of the French Revolutionary Wars, marked by political extremism and atrocities. Yet Dumas won a reputation as a humane commander, who allegedly once had a gui ...

Jacobins

The Jacobins were a group of radicalists who supported The French Revolution. Their leader was Maximilien de Robespierre, and they were in power of the French government from June of 1793 to July of 1794. Initially founded in 1789 by anti-royalis ...

Tennis Court Oath

The oath was a pledge signed by 576 members out of 577 of Frances Third Estate and a few members of the First Estate on June 20, 1789 in a tennis court near the Palace of Versailles. The meeting hall of the Estates General had been locked acciden ...

Bolshevik

A Bolshevik was a Russian Communist. They are also called the Bolshevik Communists. The majority of the Russian Social Democratic Workers Party was a Marxist political party. In 1903 at the Party Congress members disagreed with each other. The Pa ...

February Revolution

The February Revolution of 1917 was a revolution that ended the monarchy in the Russian Empire. A provisional government replaced the Tsar, Nicholas II. This was the beginning of the Russian Revolution. The February Revolution was caused by probl ...

Netherlands Antilles

The Netherlands Antilles was a country within the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The country was originally a group of six islands in the Caribbean Sea. Some were discovered in 1493 by Christopher Columbus, and some were discovered in 1499 by Alonso ...

Netherlands Antilles at the Olympics

Netherlands Antilles at the Olympics is a history which began in 1931. The International Olympic Committees official abbreviation for the region of the Netherlands Antilles was NAN. It is now AHO.

Eureka Stockade

The Eureka Stockade is the name given to a rebellion by gold miners at Ballarat, Victoria, Australia. It took place at sunrise, on December 3, 1854. The miners came from England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Canada, Italy, Hungary, France, Germany, ...

2021 Eastern Australian floods

Extreme rainfall on the east coast of Australia beginning on 18 March 2021 led to massive flooding in New South Wales, affecting regions from the North Coast to the Sydney metropolitan area in the south. Suburbs of Sydney experienced the worst fl ...

Urartian language

Urartian is the name for the language spoken by the people of the ancient kingdom of Urartu in northeast Anatolia, in the region of Lake Van. Urartian was a language isolate, which was neither Semitic nor Indo-European, but a member of the Hurro- ...

Classical Athens

Classical Athens refers to the city of Athens from 508 to 322 BC. Athenian democracy was established in 508 BC under Cleisthenes, after the tyranny of the Peistratids and the rule of Isagoras. This system remained remarkably stable, and with a fe ...

Stoa of Eumenes

Stoa of Eumenes was a stoa on the Acropolis of Athens. The building was a gift to the city in about 160 BC, by Eumenes II of Pergamon. Today there are ruins of the stoa at the south part of the Acropolis, between the Odeon of Herodes Atticus and ...

Ancient Corinth

Corinth is at a critical place in the Peloponnese, a city-state on the Isthmus of Corinth. Ancient Corinth was one of the largest and most important cities of Ancient Greece, with a population of 90.000 in 400 BC. The Romans demolished Corinth in ...

Crito (Plato)

Crito is a dialogue written by the ancient Greek writer and philosopher Plato in 360 BC. Its only characters are Socrates and Crito. It centers around the moral consequences of helping Socrates escape from prison. Socrates argues against defying ...

Pantheon

The Pantheon is a building in Rome. It was originally built as a temple to the gods of Ancient Rome, and rebuilt about 126 AD during Hadrians reign. Today, it is not known what gods were included. The Pantheon is the best preserved of all Roman b ...

Plinys Comedy and Tragedy villas

Plinys Comedy and Tragedy villas were two Roman villas owned by Pliny the Younger in the 1st century. They were on the shores of Lake Como in northern Italy. Pliny had several villas on Lake Como. He wrote to his friend Voconius Romanus that the ...

Cato the Elder

Marcus Porcius Cato was a Roman statesman, surnamed the Censor, Sapiens, Priscus, or the Elder, to distinguish him from Cato the Younger. He came of an ancient Plebeian family who all were noted for some military service but not for the discharge ...

Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero was a Roman statesman, consul, lawyer, political theorist and philosopher. He is often thought to be one of Romes greatest orators and prose stylists. His Latin is thought to be the model of Classical Latin. He introduced Gr ...

Sejanus

Sejanus, was an ambitious soldier, friend and confidant of the Roman Emperor Tiberius. An equestrian by birth, Sejanus rose to power as Praetorian Prefect. He commanded the Roman imperial bodyguard, the Praetorian Guard, from AD 14 until his deat ...

Vipsania Agrippina

Vipsania Agrippina was the daughter of Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa from his first wife Caecilia Attica. Octavian and her father betrothed her to Tiberius before her first birthday. In about 19 BC she married Tiberius. Their son Drusus Julius Caesar ...

Bosporan Kingdom

The Bosporan Kingdom was an ancient empire, covering the Crimea and a lot of the north coast of the Black Sea. It is regarded as the first real Hellenistic country also speaking Greek.

Western Roman Empire

The Western Roman Empire was the western half of the Roman Empire, from its division by Diocletian in 286 AD. The other half of the Roman Empire became known as the Eastern Roman Empire, later known as the Byzantine Empire. The whole Roman Empire ...

Roman Empire

The Roman Empire was the largest empire of the ancient world. Its capital was Rome, and its empire was based in the Mediterranean. The empire started in 27 BC, when Octavian became Emperor Augustus. The Western Roman Empire fell in 476 AD, markin ...

Augustus

Augustus was the first Roman Emperor, ruling from 27 BC until his death in AD 14. He led Rome in its transition from the Roman Republic to the Roman Empire.

Year of the Five Emperors

The Year of the Five Emperors refers to the year 193 AD, in which there were five claimants for the title of Roman Emperor. The five were Pertinax, Didius Julianus, Pescennius Niger, Clodius Albinus and Severus.

Roman dictator

A dictator was the senior magistrate of the Roman Republic. They were regularly appointed from the earliest period of the Republic down to the Second Punic War. Dictators had the full authority of the state to deal with a military emergency or to ...

Second Triumvirate

The Second Triumvirate was an alliance between Octavian, Mark Antony and Lepidus. It was formed to punish the conspirators who assassinated Julius Caesar. The Triumvirate lasted from 43 BC to 33 BC. It ended the effort by Marcus Tullius Cicero to ...

SPQR

SPQR are the initials of a Latin phrase S enātus P opulus q ue R ōmānus. It means "The Roman Senate and People" or "The Senate and People of Rome". It refers to the government of the ancient Roman Republic. It is still used as an official emblem ...

Roman roads in Britain

The Roman roads in Britain were, with Roman aqueducts, and the Roman army, one of the most impressive features of the Roman Empire in Britain. In Britannia, as in other provinces, the Romans constructed a network of paved trunk roads to surfaced ...

Dere Street

Dere Street was a Roman road in Britain. It ran between Eboracum and the Antonine Wall at Boness, in what is now Scotland. Dere Street still exists as the route of major roads, including the A1 and A68 just north of Corbridge. Its name comes from ...

Watling Street

Watling Street is the name of an ancient route in England. It was first used by the Ancient Britons between Canterbury and St Albans. Later the Romans made it one of the main Roman roads in Britain. The Romans paved the route from London to the p ...

Edward I of England

Edward I, also Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots, was a Plantagenet King of England. He became king on 21 November 1272, until his death in 1307. His mother was Queen Eleanor of Provence and his father was King Henry III of England. As a you ...

Edward III of England

Edward III was a King of England. He ruled for 50 years. He made England the strongest military power in England. Edward was crowned when he was fourteen years old, after his father was forced to abdicate. After his victory against the Scots, he ...

Henry IV of England

Henry IV was a King of England. He was born at Bolingbroke Castle in Lincolnshire, which is why he was often called "Henry Bolingbroke".

Tudor period

The Tudor period usually refers to the period between 1485 and 1603, specifically in relation to the history of England. This was the period when the Tudor dynasty ruled in England. Its first monarch was Henry VII. The term is often used more bro ...

History of racial segregation in the United States

Racial segregation means separating people because of their races. In the United States, racial segregation has existed since before the United States was its own country. Slavery, racist laws, racist attitudes, and many other things caused the U ...

Second Fleet (Australia)

The Second Fleet is the name of the second group of ships sent with settlers, convicts and supplies to colony at Sydney Cove in Port Jackson, Australia. There were six ships in the fleet: one Royal Navy Escort, four convict ships, and a supply sh ...

Federalism in the United States

Federalism in the United States is the relationship between the state governments and the federal government. This relationship is set out in the United States Constitution. The Constitution says which powers the federal government has, and which ...

Maria Reynolds

Maria Reynolds was a woman who lived in the 1700s. She is famous for having an affair with Alexander Hamilton. In 1791, when Maria Reynolds was 23, she went to Alexander Hamiltons house in Philadelphia. She said her husband had left and she wante ...

The United States in the 19th century

The United States was a country in the 19th century. During this time it grew from 17 states to 45 states. The year was from 1801 till 1900 in the Gregorian calendar. States like Utah, Illinois and Mississippi were added to the United States. The ...

Border Ruffian

Border Ruffians were pro-slavery activists from the slave-state of Missouri. From 1854 to 1860 they crossed the state border into Kansas Territory to force the acceptance of slavery there. The name was applied by Free-Staters in Kansas and abolit ...

Convict lease

Convict leasing was a form of forced labor used by prisons in the Southern United States. Under the system, prisons leased prisoners out as free workers to corporations, business owners, and plantation owners. Basically, the prisons were selling ...

Gilded Age

The Gilded Age is a time in the in history of the USA. It lasted from the end of the American Civil War, and up to the late 19th century. It corresponds to the latter part of the British Victorian era. The name Gilded Age was first used by writer ...

Populist Movement

The Populist Movement, also known as the Peoples Party was a movement in late-19th century America. It grew out of groups such as the Grange Movement. It was largely a movement of farmers, who were poor and felt big businesses, such as railroads, ...

Encyclopedic dictionary

Translation
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Pino - logical board game which is based on tactics and strategy. In general this is a remix of chess, checkers and corners. The game develops imagination, concentration, teaches how to solve tasks, plan their own actions and of course to think logically. It does not matter how much pieces you have, the main thing is how they are placement!

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