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Holocaust victims

During The Holocaust, millions of people died or were killed in Nazi Germany. These Holocaust victims included about six million Jewish people. They also included five million of people who were not Jewish, mainly Poles and Roma. Holocaust victim ...

Lagerordnung

The Lagerordnung was a set of rules for punishing prisoners at Dachau concentration camp in Nazi Germany. On January 1, 1934, the Lagerordnung became the official rules of every concentration camp in Nazi Germany. Also known as the Strafkatalog P ...

Nazi eugenics

Nazi eugenics were a set of beliefs and rules that were very important to Nazi Germany during World War II. These beliefs said that the Aryan race was the master race – the best race of all – and all other races were inferior. There were also man ...

Soap made from human corpses

During World War II, many people thought that the Nazis were making soap from the bodies of Jewish people who died in the concentration camps. The Yad Vashem Memorial has said that the Nazis did not make a lot of soap from Jewish bodies. Yad Vash ...

Wannsee Conference

The Wannsee Conference was a meeting of senior members of the Nazi German government. It was held in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee on 20 January 1942. The conference was to tell leaders of government departments that dealt with Jews, that Adolf Ei ...

Franz Magill

Franz Magill was the son of a day laborer. His father bought a small farm in Zuchen in 1908, where Magill graduated from elementary school. He was called up at the end of the First World War and after the end of the war in 1919 he became a volunt ...

Philippe Petain

Philippe Petain was a French General who served as leader of Vichy France between 1940 and 1944. During World War I Petain was the hero of the Battle of Verdun and led the French Army until the end of the war in 1918. In 1940 during the Battle of ...

ISO 4217

ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three-letter codes to define the names of currencies, as established by the International Organization for Standardization. The ISO 4217 code list is the common way in banking and business, all ov ...

ISO 8601

ISO 8601 is an international standard to describe dates and times in the easiest way possible for computers to understand. This standard is based on putting the biggest types of numbers first and the smallest numbers last. Because years are bigge ...

International Bank Account Number

The International Bank Account Number is an internationally-recognised way of identifying bank account numbers. Its abbreviation is IBAN ". The IBAN was developed to enable people in the European Union to send money to a bank account in another c ...

Coat of arms

A coat of arms is a unique design painted on a shield. These designs may be inherited, meaning that they pass from a father to his children. In the Middle Ages, these designs were shown on real shields, but today they are usually only drawn or pa ...

Bullseye (mascot)

Bullseye is the mascot of Target Corporation. It is a Bull Terrier that is used for Targets advertising and marketing starting in 1999. The dog has the Target logo on its left eye. The makeup used for the logo is natural and non-toxic. There have ...

Chuck E. Cheese (character)

Charles Entertainment Chuck E. Cheese is the anthropomorphic rat mascot of the Chuck E. Cheese chain of family entertainment centers. In 2012, the rat mascot was rebranded into a mouse.

The Delicious One

The Delicious One, otherwise known as TDO / T.D.O. for short, is the mascot of Wienerschnitzel. The Delicious One is an anthropomorphic chili dog. Almost everybody wants to eat the Delicious One due to him being a hot dog, his famous trademark is ...

List of British national symbols

State symbols of the United Kingdom, is a list of the National symbols of the United Kingdom, its constituent countries. Each separate entry has its own set of unique Symbols respectively. UK things which are emblematic, representative or otherwi ...

National emblem

Papua New Guinea - bird of paradise. Bulgaria – lion. Albania – eagle. Panama – harpy eagle. Soviet Union – Siberian tiger. Bolivia – llama. Bangladesh – Bengal tiger National animal, Dugong National aquatic marine mammal, Oriental magpie-robin N ...

Tiananmen

The Tiananmen is a monument in Beijing, China. It is widely used as a national symbol of China. It was built during the Ming dynasty in 1420. Tiananmen was the entrance to the Imperial City, within which the Forbidden City was located. Tiananmen ...

Greek numerals

Greek numerals are a system of representing numbers using letters of the Greek alphabet. They are also known by the names Milesian numerals, Alexandrian numerals, or alphabetic numerals. In modern Greece, they are still in use for ordinal numbers ...

Hebrew numerals

The system of Hebrew numerals is a quasi-decimal alphabetic numeral system using the letters of the Hebrew alphabet. In this system, zero does not have a place, and the number values for each letter are added together. Each unit 1, 2., 9 is assig ...

Long and short scales

The long and short scales are two of several large-number naming systems for integer powers of ten that use the same words with different meanings. The long scale is based on powers of one million, whereas the short scale is based on powers of on ...

Sexagesimal

Sexagesimal is a number system with sixty as its base. It was invented by the ancient Sumerians in the 3rd millennium BC. It was passed down to the ancient Babylonians, and it is still used - in a modified form - for measuring time, angles, and g ...

Seal of Oklahoma

The Great Seal of Oklahoma is a five-pointed star in a circle. The center of the star is made up of the Seal of the Territory of Oklahoma. Inside the star are seals of five Native American Nations from Oklahoma. The top point is for the Chickasaw ...

Seal of Alabama

The Great Seal of the State of Alabama is the state seal of the U.S. state of Alabama. It was designed in 1817 by William Wyatt Bibb, the governor of the "Alabama Territory" and the subsequent first governor of the state. When Alabama became a st ...

Seal of Maine

The Seal of the State of Maine was adopted in June 1820. There have been different kinds in the details of the seal, but the overall design and images remain true to the first. The center of the seal is a shield with a tranquil scene of a moose r ...

Seal of Mississippi

The Mississippi State Seal was adopted in 1798, back when Mississippi was a U.S. territory, the Mississippi territory. When it became a state in 1817, it was declared the state seal. The central part of the seal has an eagle centered inside it. T ...

Seal of Wisconsin

The seal has the words "Great Seal of the State of Wisconsin" at its top. At the bottom, it has a cornucopia alongside bars of lead, above 13 stars, one for each of the original 13 states. Also at the top is Forward, the state motto, and a badger ...

Guy du Merle

Guy du Merle was a French aerospace engineer, pilot and writer. He was the first head of the French Civil Aviation University. Du Merle graduated from the Ecole Polytechnique 1927 and the Ecole nationale superieure de laeronautique et de lespace ...

Louis Pailhas

Louis Pailhas, was a French politician and aerospace engineer. From December 1967 to 1982, he was head of the French Civil Aviation University. Graduate from French Civil Aviation University Promotion 1949, he did different jobs in civil aviation ...

Lorenzo da Ponte

Lorenzo da Ponte was an opera librettist and poet. He is best known for having written the libretti for three of Mozarts operas, The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, and Così fan tutte.

Thomas Hunt Morgan

Thomas Hunt Morgan was an American geneticist and embryologist. Morgan took his PhD at Johns Hopkins University in 1890, and researched embryology while at Bryn Mawr College. After the rediscovery of Mendelian inheritance in 1900, Morgan switched ...

Harold Urey

Harold Clayton Urey was an American physical chemist. His pioneering work on isotopes earned him the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1934. He played a significant role in the development of the atom bomb, and he had ideas on the development of organi ...

William Vickrey

William Spencer Vickrey was a Canadian-American professor of economics. He is a Nobel Laureate. He was awarded the 1996 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences with James Mirrlees for their research into the economic theory of incentives under ...

James A. Michener

James Albert Michener was an American writer. His books include Tales of the South Pacific, Hawaii, The Drifters, Texas, and Poland. Most of his 40 books are very large sagas. They are about the lives of many generations in a particular place. Hi ...

Hilary Putnam

Hilary Whitehall Putnam was an American philosopher, mathematician, and computer scientist. He was a central figure in analytic philosophy from the 1960s. He worked in philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, philosophy of mathematics, and phi ...

B. F. Skinner

Burrhus Frederic Skinner was a leading American psychologist and author. Skinner was the leading behaviorist in psychology, he built on the work of John B. Watson, and added the idea of operant conditioning. These two American psychologists paid ...

Arthur Kornberg

Arthur Kornberg was an American biochemist who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1959 for his discovery of "the mechanisms in the biological synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid with Severo Ochoa of New York University. He was awarded t ...

Lafcadio Hearn

Patrick Lafcadio Hearn was a writer. People know him for his books about Japan, especially his collections of Japanese legends and ghost stories, such as Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things. In the United States, Hearn also wrote about ...

Gilles Binchois

Gilles Binchois, was a Franco-Flemish composer. His name is spelt in various ways:" Binchoys”," Binch” or" Binche” or" Gilles de Bins”. He is one of the earliest composers of the group known as the Burgundian School. His style of composition had ...

Guillaume Dufay

Guillaume Dufay was a Franco-Flemish composer and music theorist of the early Renaissance. He was the most important composer of his time. He belonged to the group of composers known as the Burgundian School. He had more influence on music in Eur ...

Josquin des Prez

Josquin des Prez was a French composer. He was one of the greatest composers of the Renaissance. He changed music from the sound of medieval compositions and developed the style which led to the great compositions of the 16th century Renaissance ...

Orlande de Lassus

Orlande de Lassus was a Franco-Flemish composer who lived in the last part of the Renaissance. Lassus and Palestrina are the two most famous composers of that time who were writing church music in a polyphonic style.

Jacob Obrecht

Jacob Obrecht was a composer from the south Netherlands. He was one of the greatest composers of his time. He is best known for his church music, including many masses as well as motets and songs.

Johannes Ockeghem

Johannes Ockeghem, was the most famous composer of the Franco-Flemish School in the last half of the 15th century, and is often thought of as the most important composer between Dufay and Josquin des Prez. He was an excellent choirmaster and teac ...

Cipriano de Rore

Cipriano de Rore was a composer who lived in the Renaissance period. He was Flemish, but spent all his adult life in Italy. The name de Rore is a proper Flemish name, not a name that has been changed to look Italian. He was one of the most import ...

Giaches de Wert

Giaches de Wert was a Flemish composer who lived and worked in Italy. He was one of the most important composers of madrigals in the Renaissance period.

Adrian Willaert

Adrian Willaert, was a Flemish composer in the Renaissance period. He was one of the most important composers of his time. He went to Italy when he was young and spent the rest of his life there. He belonged to the group of composers who lived an ...

Pieter Brueghel the Elder

Pieter Brueghel the Elder was a Dutch or Flemish Renaissance painter and printmaker. He is known for his landscapes and peasant scenes. He is nicknamed Peasant Bruegel to distinguish him from other members of the Brueghel family. But he is the mo ...

Henry van de Velde

Henry Clemens Van de Velde was a Belgian painter, architect and interior designer. Together with Victor Horta and Paul Hankar he is one of the main founders of Art Nouveau in Belgium. Van de Velde spent the most important part of his career in Ge ...

Egide Charles Gustave Wappers

He studied at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, and during 1826 in Paris. The Romantic movement with its new ideas about art and politics was happening in France. Wappers was the first Belgian artist to use this form. His first painting, ...

Archie Barton

Dr Archie Barton, AM was an Aboriginal Australian activist. He fought for land rights and compensation for the Maralinga Tjarutja people against the Australian and British governments in the 1980s and 1990s. He played an important role in the 20- ...

Encyclopedic dictionary

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Pino - logical board game which is based on tactics and strategy. In general this is a remix of chess, checkers and corners. The game develops imagination, concentration, teaches how to solve tasks, plan their own actions and of course to think logically. It does not matter how much pieces you have, the main thing is how they are placement!

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